Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons

Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons

Brothers is a beautiful and simple game. Unusually, it’s a cooperative game that you play by yourself. Two thumbsticks and two triggers are all that is used to play and control the two characters.

The two boys - one older and stronger, one younger and more agile - travel on an epic journey to save their father. On this journey they encounter dead giants and pet griffins and love-struck trolls, all shown in beautiful visuals. But while the quest is epic each scene is small and intimate.

 
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The camera will sometimes pan to show what is coming up, but nearly always the focus stays on the two brothers. And they never stray far from each other: they can’t. Take one too far from his sibling and they complain. They are connected, sometimes literally, and they need each other to complete their quest. While sometimes their paths are identical, more often the two will have to complete both halves of a task before they can continue.

But this is where the game does something wonderful: it never tells you what to do. The game doesn’t start with a tutorial, and none of the puzzles give you a hint. Even the characters themselves don’t speak English (or any other language). It lets you explore with the same curiosity and adventure that the two sons do.

Like many story-driven games that don’t give you points and where the characters you play are vulnerable, it’s hard not to quickly become completely attached to the sons. There are plenty of perils along the way to harm them; some you run from, some you fight (though never in a direct fashion).

It’s odd that in a game where you play as children, you might want to be there if your children play it. Not for shocks or gore, but for the emotions that the story evokes. Even the opening scene is heart wrenching.

I want to tell you so much more, but I can’t without revealing the story. I will tell you that the controls will confuse you while you play unless you can control both hemispheres of your brain separately. You will find the characters running in separate directions or walking into walls and barrels, or worse, falling to their deaths.

Brothers is a wonderful piece of storytelling and a fantastic puzzle game that’ll make you want to hug a loved one. Highly recommended.


Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons
"An emotional tale of two siblings played on one controller."
- Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons
9.3
Excellent
 
Follow Own it? Rating: G   Difficulty: Easy   Learning Curve: 15 Min


 

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Comments Comments (7)

 
KiwiSharp NZGamer.com VIP VIP Silver
Posted by KiwiSharp
On Tuesday 22 Oct 2013 8:24 AM
1
Sounds interesting. I like a good storyline, might give this a crack in the future.
 
 
 
Bappernz NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by Bappernz
On Tuesday 22 Oct 2013 2:31 PM
1
everything i see about this game makes me want to play it
 
 
 
Deanology NZGamer.com VIP VIP Gold
Posted by Deanology
On Tuesday 22 Oct 2013 3:19 PM
1
Does sound interesting.
I may have a look into it sometime.
 
 
 
Winger Gee NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by Winger Gee
On Tuesday 22 Oct 2013 7:08 PM
1
I would love a simpler adventure based puzzle game- this sounds like one worth trying.
 
 
 
hadyngreen NZGamer.com VIP VIP
Posted by hadyngreen
On Wednesday 23 Oct 2013 10:44 AM
-
Brothers also has something that I haven't seen in a console game since... I actually can't even think of when I've seen it...

In the main game menu has a "quit game" option to get you back to the dashboard. WHY DON'T ALL GAMES HAVE THIS?!
 
 
 
Coddfish NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by Coddfish
On Wednesday 23 Oct 2013 9:29 PM
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23 October 2013, 10:44 AM Reply to hadyngreen
Brothers also has something that I haven't seen in a console game since... I actually can't even think of when I've seen it...

In the main game menu has a "quit game" option to get you back to the dashboard. WHY DON'T ALL GAMES HAVE THIS?!
I think it's because current gen consoles all let you exit the game from the system UI, making a Quit option on the main menu more or less redundant.

It's nice to see, though.
 
 
 
Jonny5 from NZ
Posted by Jonny5 from NZ
On Monday 13 Jan 2014 3:04 PM
1
This is a beautifully executed game. DO NOT rush through it. Unfortunately it is pretty short, but every minute is gold and it is worth the $20 admission price.