Beyond: Two Souls

Beyond: Two Souls
 
 

“Did you like the game?”
“Well it’s not really a game, as such. It’s more like a movie where you control bits.”
“So did you like the movie?”

This is the crux of it. Beyond: Two Souls is a pretty great, kind of long, sci-fi supernatural thriller about Jodie - a young girl - and the spirit Aiden attached to her with a supernatural tether. The game elements are pretty much walking with occasional quicktime-style actions. This is not a bad thing, but it is an odd thing.

 
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The Game

There aren’t many game elements, so let me get them out of the way.

When you get full control of Jodie, the left thumbstick does the usual walking around but the right stick doesn’t do the usual looking around. Instead you’ll use the right thumbstick to do actions like opening doors and investigating items. Stuff you can interact with is denoted by a white dot. It’s very simple.

In more “action heavy” areas, you might be required to shake the controller, press buttons in a sequence, or perform other busy-work. It often feels a little silly, but how else do you simulate cleaning a room (seriously, one level gets you to tidy up Jodie's apartment)?

Controlling Aiden is bit more complicated as he floats in three dimensions. Aiden can only interact with certain elements in the world - usually bumping things or knocking them over - by focussing on them and moving both thumbsticks in particular directions. Aiden’s cool power is that he can incapacitate enemies and sometimes take them over.

Aiden is constrained by the tether to Jodie, so while he can travel through walls he can’t stray too far away. Often this means having to draw enemies closed before they can be removed.

The most interesting control aspect is that if you want you can use your smartphone to control the characters. Downloading the Beyond: Touch app (Android, Apple, Windows Phone) and running it on the same WiFi network as your PlayStation gives you another controller. This will also work in two player mode (one player is Jodie, the other is Aiden.) I played the first few sequences with the app and was happily surprised with its ease of use, but I reverted to the PS3 controller for a greater range of motion.

There are some combat sequences in the game and these are done with very simple quicktime-esque controls (press X now, etc.) At a couple of points you’ll also be required to drive a vehicle, but if you’re hoping for a GTA-level of control, you’ll be disappointed.

Oddly it’s the gameplay features that let the game down for me. The movements are a little jerky and simplicity of it is not mirrored in the complex storyline.

The Movie

The story of Jodie’s starts in a police station, after she has been picked up by a friendly Sheriff. Jodie has clearly been in some trouble - her shaved head reveals a large scar. This episode, like many in the story, is short and serves more to establish the character than make you play a game.

The motion and facial capture techniques used to make Beyond have created characters that you can truly empathise with. Ellen Page and Willem Dafoe (who actually act out the key roles) both put their all into their work, and it shows -.neither seem to have phoned in their performances simply because they spent their days covered in dots and surrounded by green screens.

The episodes are played out in a haphazard fashion throughout Jodie’s life. You see her as a child, a rebellious teenager, and as a young woman. Despite the non-chronological sequence, the story develops in a wonderfully linear fashion. Secrets in the past are hidden until later in the game that not only explain previous story elements but also lead into greater secrets and twists.

While this is clearly a strong narrative you do get to influence it. At various points, you control how conversations flow and make life choices for Jodie. This doesn’t seem to change much beyond the episode that you are currently playing, however I found it a wonderful way to destroy some of the Hollywood tropes that inevitably slide their way in.

Aiden’s role is as a protector of Jodie, but as the story continued I couldn’t help but feel that I was the same. I suppose that’s the role of anyone playing a game, you’re there to make sure your character doesn’t die. But after you’ve played as Jodie as a little girl, it’s hard not to feel overly protective of her.

There are echoes of a number of films in Beyond, especially the horror classic Carrie (about a bullied young woman with paranormal powers) and the Sixth Sense. During one particular scene (that I won’t spoil) I was so tense in my choices for Jodie because the sense of something dreadful happening that I kept playing it safe (to no avail I might add). This tension about trying to help Jodie be a normal teenager (whatever a normal teenager is) by hiding her powers eases as the game progresses.

This doesn’t mean that the overall tension eases, but it changes. Different conflicts arise and new mysteries are brought up. And horror.

If you ever want to make something scary just add creepy children, darkness, and dead people. I made the mistake of playing one incredibly creepy sequence just before going to sleep.

Story is everything in this game. Jodie is a shattered human and the story is constructed so you see her broken over and over and then attempting to rebuild. The beautiful graphics and facial expressions bond you to Jodie, and the raw emotion embodied by Aiden is conveyed not via gameplay but by sound design and the reactions of the supporting cast. By the end of the game you are as connected to Jodie as Aiden is.


Beyond: Two Souls
"Play as the most powerful fragile young woman in the world"
- Beyond: Two Souls
9.4
Excellent
 
Follow Own it? Rating: R16   Difficulty: Easy   Learning Curve: 15 Min


 

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Comments Comments (32)

 
sick_wierdo
Posted by sick_wierdo
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 6:53 AM
-4
Highest score yet for it. Everywhere else on the net is giving it some quite middle of the road reviews, around the 6 out of 10 mark, with most saying the story is muddled, combat controls are a mess, and there's hardly any reason to call it a game at all, more like a movie you very occasionally press a button or move a stick to change scenes. Perhaps this maybe an over excited review? I guess people will make the up their own mind, but based on all the other reviews I've seen I'm going to pass. Disappointing to say the least.
 
 
 
wharekura NZGamer.com VIP VIP
Posted by wharekura
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 8:21 AM
1
maybe worth a rental to get a taste of it and then buy it when it gets cheap for those of us with huge mortgages and kids :)
 
 
 
wharekura NZGamer.com VIP VIP
Posted by wharekura
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 8:23 AM
1
metacritic and gamespot has good scores?!
 
 
 
fifamessi NZGamer.com VIP VIP Gold
Posted by fifamessi
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 8:23 AM
2
Awesome review

Can't wait to get it :D
 
 
 
ALK3MiST NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by ALK3MiST
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 8:38 AM
2
i played the demo kind of knowing what to expect having completed heavy rain. but i was blown away and left wanting more by the time it's not for everyone but im definitely going to get my hands on this.
 
 
 
Bunnny NZGamer.com VIP VIP Silver
Posted by Bunnny
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 9:22 AM
-
Going to be playing this tonight.

I'm half expecting enjoyment.
But I wouldn't really be surprised if I felt let down.
The demo was quite interesting, I think there won't be much re playability though, due to the linear seemingness. But hey I could be wrong.
 
 
 
phantom
Posted by phantom
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 9:28 AM
6
I had a feeling this would be divisive; David Cage has a no-compromises approach when chasing his vision, which means his games tend to be unique and quite different to anything else out there. As a result, some will love it (and some of them will consider it a high watermark for _all_ games) while others will loathe it. I think it's important to point out that both reactions are equally valid; you don't have to like something for it to be good, and if other people don't like that thing you like it doesn't take anything away from your experience. Enjoy it if you do, but don't feel bad if you don't!
 
 
 
AudaciousGnome NZGamer.com VIP VIP Silver
Posted by AudaciousGnome
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 9:29 AM
7
9 October 2013, 06:53 AM Reply to sick_wierdo
Highest score yet for it. Everywhere else on the net is giving it some quite middle of the road reviews, around the 6 out of 10 mark, with most saying the story is muddled, combat controls are a mess, and there's hardly any reason to call it a game at all, more like a movie you very occasionally press a button or move a stick to change scenes. Perhaps this maybe an over excited review? I guess people will make the up their own mind, but based on all the other reviews I've seen I'm going to pass. Disappointing to say the least.
"but based on all the other reviews I've seen I'm going to pass. Disappointing to say the least."

How can you pass on a game just because of reviews? Reviews are biased and based on one persons perspective.

If you were excited to get it, then get it and see how good/bad it is for yourself.
 
 
 
sick_wierdo
Posted by sick_wierdo
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 9:43 AM
-1
9 October 2013, 09:29 AM Reply to AudaciousGnome
"but based on all the other reviews I've seen I'm going to pass. Disappointing to say the least."

How can you pass on a game just because of reviews? Reviews are biased and based on one persons perspective.

If you were excited to get it, then get it and see how good/bad it is for yourself.
Thanks for the downvote. Generally most people will read reviews to gauge the general consensus of how a game is if they intend on buying it, like myself. If you were waiting for a game to come out and it got sh*t reviews all round (not saying this has by any means), that you would still buy it? If you had any sense you wouldn't. Based on personal experience, games that have had generally mixed or unfavourable reviews that I have gone ahead and bought anyway I haven't enjoyed, so that is why I stand by my comment. I didn't say anyone else should pass on it, but in this case, I am.
 
 
 
sick_wierdo
Posted by sick_wierdo
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 9:49 AM
1
9 October 2013, 09:28 AM Reply to phantom
I had a feeling this would be divisive; David Cage has a no-compromises approach when chasing his vision, which means his games tend to be unique and quite different to anything else out there. As a result, some will love it (and some of them will consider it a high watermark for _all_ games) while others will loathe it. I think it's important to point out that both reactions are equally valid; you don't have to like something for it to be good, and if other people don't like that thing you like it doesn't take anything away from your experience. Enjoy it if you do, but don't feel bad if you don't!
Agreed, but I wanted more of a "game" if you know what I mean. I am well aware that it was intended to be more of an interactive drama type thing, but from what I'm hearing, the interactivity is so minimal it just doesn't put Beyond in the class of a game. I already have enough movies to watch. Sounds like I'm already getting crap for having an opinion that other's don't agree with so I'm off this article.
 
 
 
RKO_NZ NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by RKO_NZ
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 9:54 AM
-
This is one of those games where the audience will be torn towards weather they like it or not, I think to really be engrossed and engaged into into David Cage's games, it help's if the players have previously played Heavy Rain AND Fahrenheit (Indigo Prophecy) both games follow similar story paths and themes and you appreciate the game for what it is if you experience earlier projects and see how those games have evolved into what Beyond Two Souls is. Also by now for people who have played Heavy Rain should of expected the not-so-great control schemes Quantic Dream use in their games and should also expect that this isn't one of those everyday games. I'm looking forward to this game, once I've finished it we'll see weather this matches up to Heavy Rain's story standard
 
 
 
haydensomething NZGamer.com VIP VIP
Posted by haydensomething
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 10:59 AM
8
I think it is a good review and a fair score. A big problem with these sorts of games, are people buying them and expecting something that it isn't. The reviewer has made it clear that this is more of an interactive story than a fully fledged game, and has reviewed it as such. In that respect it is probably more valuable than any remarks you will get out of a call_of_duty9000 reviewer.

The line at which a game stops being a game and just becomes a movie/story is a blurry one, and is different for all of us. That is why games like these are always so divisive..
 
 
 
Ron NZGamer.com VIP VIP Gold
Posted by Ron
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 1:27 PM
2
Based off the previous efforts and the review I'm gonna pick this up.
 
 
 
Newsboy NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by Newsboy
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 2:06 PM
4
I'm a massive fan of Heavy Rain, and other interactive movies like Asura's Wrath. Anyone who is expecting anything other than a Heavy Rain like experience is deluding themselves and obviously have little to no knowledge of Quantic Dream. When Haydn gives a game a high schore, I know it's going to be a good one :)
 
 
 
ssjroneel NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by ssjroneel
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 3:13 PM
2
Some very mixed reviews on this one, its interesting to see what people like, and dont like about it. Personally i will be getting this regardless as ive been excited for over a year, and have pre ordered it long ago.
While reviews are nice guidelines, i still prefer to make my own judgments. :)
 
 
 
Syn-Ryn NZGamer.com VIP VIP Gold
Posted by Syn-Ryn
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 3:22 PM
-4
9 October 2013, 01:27 PM Reply to Ron
Based off the previous efforts and the review I'm gonna pick this up.
Based on Quantic Dreams last two games, my expectations for this are pretty low.

Fahrenheit was just complete sh*t, and is one of the worst games I've ever actually taken the time to finish, just to see how bad it could get.

Heavy Rain was enjoyable the first time I played through it, and was certainly a lot better than Fahrenheit, but the story was a poorly written mess.
 
 
 
baileynz NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by baileynz
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 4:18 PM
-
Enjoyed the demo, it was fun to play something a bit different.
 
 
 
Bappernz NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by Bappernz
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 5:23 PM
-
am looking forward to picking this game up
 
 
 
ZombieRawkMachine NZGamer.com VIP VIP Gold
Posted by ZombieRawkMachine
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 5:35 PM
-
Waiting for the re-order to arrive. Loved Fahrenheit and Heavy Rain was great (albeit predictable and a tad mediocre). Cage gives me exactly what I want and that is a good story based game.
 
 
 
jtbthatsme NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by jtbthatsme
On Wednesday 9 Oct 2013 11:34 PM
3
Well I'm keen to give this a try....interactive movie/game or not it looked pretty interesting from the clips i've seen.
 
 
 
kiwibadboy NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by kiwibadboy
On Thursday 10 Oct 2013 1:08 PM
1
A review is biased yes, but I can accept that this game deserves the score. The story seems to be magnificent, and apparently very much like Heavy Rain. If it's anything like Heavy Rain, then I would absolutely love it.

A review gives you a good idea of how good or bad a game is, but every person has a different taste.
Hayden (the reviewer) enjoys games that are more movie-like and heavily story-focused. Even if combat and and gameplay aren't the best.
That was the case with Heavy Rain (in my opinion), yet I still hold that game as one of my favourites of all time. Try a game before you judge it based on a review, because you might just be blown away.

For example, the Yakuza games are by far my favourite game franchise. But I would have never got to play such a priceless gem if I had listened to the reviews it gets. The Yakuza games get moderate reviews, around 6-8. Yet, in my opinion it is undoubtedly at 10/10. Yakuza 5 in Japan is one of a few games to ever receive a perfect score from Famitsu (40/40). That goes to show how much tastes vary from culture to culture, or even gamer to gamer.

So, my point is, play this before you judge it. And if you still don't like it, don't go around saying it sucks when another says it's good. Because at the end of the day, we all have different tastes.
 
 
 
tnzk
Posted by tnzk
On Thursday 10 Oct 2013 3:24 PM
2
9 October 2013, 09:28 AM Reply to phantom
I had a feeling this would be divisive; David Cage has a no-compromises approach when chasing his vision, which means his games tend to be unique and quite different to anything else out there. As a result, some will love it (and some of them will consider it a high watermark for _all_ games) while others will loathe it. I think it's important to point out that both reactions are equally valid; you don't have to like something for it to be good, and if other people don't like that thing you like it doesn't take anything away from your experience. Enjoy it if you do, but don't feel bad if you don't!
"I think it's important to point out that both reactions are equally valid; you don't have to like something for it to be good, and if other people don't like that thing you like it doesn't take anything away from your experience."

I also think it's quite important to point out that just because you like something doesn't mean it's good. I've liked all of Quantic Dreams games. I still have Farenheit and Heavy Rain despite playing them through only once. However, both games are highly flawed, especially when David Cage bets the entire success of his game on the story, and yet can barely write better than an average episode of Shortland St.

I reckon they'd be a breakthrough in video game journalism if a reviewer gave a game an average to mediocre score, but said 'I liked it anyway. You might too.'
 
 
 
Benny NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by Benny
On Friday 11 Oct 2013 8:22 AM
-
10 October 2013, 01:08 PM Reply to kiwibadboy
A review is biased yes, but I can accept that this game deserves the score. The story seems to be magnificent, and apparently very much like Heavy Rain. If it's anything like Heavy Rain, then I would absolutely love it.

A review gives you a good idea of how good or bad a game is, but every person has a different taste.
Hayden (the reviewer) enjoys games that are more movie-like and heavily story-focused. Even if combat and and gameplay aren't the best.
That was the case with Heavy Rain (in my opinion), yet I still hold that game as one of my favourites of all time. Try a game before you judge it based on a review, because you might just be blown away.

For example, the Yakuza games are by far my favourite game franchise. But I would have never got to play such a priceless gem if I had listened to the reviews it gets. The Yakuza games get moderate reviews, around 6-8. Yet, in my opinion it is undoubtedly at 10/10. Yakuza 5 in Japan is one of a few games to ever receive a perfect score from Famitsu (40/40). That goes to show how much tastes vary from culture to culture, or even gamer to gamer.

So, my point is, play this before you judge it. And if you still don't like it, don't go around saying it sucks when another says it's good. Because at the end of the day, we all have different tastes.
A review isn't inherently bias. Biasm doesn't simply mean 'subjective', but implies a kind of illogical belief that isn't open to correction and can't be swayed by opposing evidence. It's a reviewer's job to be objective. The individual may have a bias belief, but a review is not so in itself.

Our culture, as of late has somehow adopted the notion that 'valid' also means 'right'. A person's opinion is valid (should be heard and acknowledged), but that does not mean what they are saying is correct. It is entirely possible for a reviewer to misrepresent the developer's intent and misunderstand the game's nature, due perhaps to poor analysis or judgment. I would therefore argue the review in question is unreliable and fallacious.

(Note: I am not talking about this review)
 
 
 
rocketman12 NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by rocketman12
On Friday 11 Oct 2013 12:08 PM
-
I agree with what everyone is saying, I have read a few reviews about this game and this is the highest score given to it. I played the demo the other day and I thought it was rather cool and would definitely consider purchasing it.
 
 
 
reavers NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by reavers
On Sunday 13 Oct 2013 7:48 PM
-
When I get the chance to play this, I'm going to get it. I did like Heavy Rain and is expecting great things from this :)
 
 
 
grieving NZGamer.com VIP VIP Bronze
Posted by grieving
On Thursday 17 Oct 2013 8:54 AM
-
9 October 2013, 09:49 AM Reply to sick_wierdo
Agreed, but I wanted more of a "game" if you know what I mean. I am well aware that it was intended to be more of an interactive drama type thing, but from what I'm hearing, the interactivity is so minimal it just doesn't put Beyond in the class of a game. I already have enough movies to watch. Sounds like I'm already getting crap for having an opinion that other's don't agree with so I'm off this article.
Your opinion is wrong because you haven't played it.
 
 
 
JandTNZ
Posted by JandTNZ
On Sunday 20 Oct 2013 5:38 PM
-
I'm disinclined to listen to review scores, especially reviews about a game so heavily focused on story. But this review was well written, up front and justified the "score" it was given.

The thing with David Cage (I call him Mr Wizard and yes I am a fan) and the stories he makes (as game just feels wrong to say when talking about Beyond Two Souls) is that story is so personal to the participant. Graphics you can see, sound design can be heard and controls feel intuitive or uncomfortable. But a story connects on a personal level, sure we can all feel sad when a character dies or feel like a badass when the hero stomps a boss but HOW moved you are is unique to you.
I feel this is part of the reason why Beyond and Heavy Rain get the polarising of opinions they receive. What connects with one person will not with another. It's the trash to one man treasure to another argument. Also due to the ambiguity of story it has been a place for reviewers to pump the x button on games they like while spiking the controller on games they don't.
What should be focused on here instead of story unless it is VERY GOOD or VERY BAD is Story Telling. How well it told it's tale. Beyond Two Souls does a good job of telling it's story well. With a mix of cut scenes, contextual animations, performance capture and ambient dialog.

I'm not sure if Beyond Two Souls is even a game. While there is room for f**king things up you can never outright fail. As soon as you start a play through 1 of the varied endings is inevitable. Just like a book all that is needed to get to the end here is time and not skill. I've always thought that challenges to overcome, interactivity and a specific skill set where an integral part of playing any game. Beyond only has 1 of those 3 legs. But surely their is room for things like Beyond Two Souls to exist in the market. It hammers home how video games have evolved beyond space invaders into an all new powerful and personal medium for telling compelling stories that can be enjoyed by anyone core gamer or not.
 
 
 
JandTNZ
Posted by JandTNZ
On Sunday 20 Oct 2013 6:27 PM
-
20 October 2013, 05:38 PM Reply to JandTNZ
I'm disinclined to listen to review scores, especially reviews about a game so heavily focused on story. But this review was well written, up front and justified the "score" it was given.

The thing with David Cage (I call him Mr Wizard and yes I am a fan) and the stories he makes (as game just feels wrong to say when talking about Beyond Two Souls) is that story is so personal to the participant. Graphics you can see, sound design can be heard and controls feel intuitive or uncomfortable. But a story connects on a personal level, sure we can all feel sad when a character dies or feel like a badass when the hero stomps a boss but HOW moved you are is unique to you.
I feel this is part of the reason why Beyond and Heavy Rain get the polarising of opinions they receive. What connects with one person will not with another. It's the trash to one man treasure to another argument. Also due to the ambiguity of story it has been a place for reviewers to pump the x button on games they like while spiking the controller on games they don't.
What should be focused on here instead of story unless it is VERY GOOD or VERY BAD is Story Telling. How well it told it's tale. Beyond Two Souls does a good job of telling it's story well. With a mix of cut scenes, contextual animations, performance capture and ambient dialog.

I'm not sure if Beyond Two Souls is even a game. While there is room for f**king things up you can never outright fail. As soon as you start a play through 1 of the varied endings is inevitable. Just like a book all that is needed to get to the end here is time and not skill. I've always thought that challenges to overcome, interactivity and a specific skill set where an integral part of playing any game. Beyond only has 1 of those 3 legs. But surely their is room for things like Beyond Two Souls to exist in the market. It hammers home how video games have evolved beyond space invaders into an all new powerful and personal medium for telling compelling stories that can be enjoyed by anyone core gamer or not.
When it comes to video gaming media seeing as we are talking about them here. I don't believe that anyone especially a video game critic should be listened too when it comes to review time. Personally I feel like shoving those stars sideways up some place dark and uncomfortable every time I hear one. Don't get me wrong I like to hear opinions and news from the journalists. But only for the fact I want to be informed and entertained. Not told what is good, bad and how I should spend my money by a pack of complete strangers.
I'm pro-developer and believe that when it comes to review time, sores and critical reviews are nothing more then an intestinal parasite on the industry that needs to die and be flushed, after finishing a good dose of common sense medication.

Times have changed and many of the critics that started out as a voice for gamers by being gamers themselves have become lost in their own little cynical, burnt out and isolated world. Chasing channel hits for money and rushing to get the game played and the review up before other channels or the gaming public has had a chance to get their hands on it.

You have to remember that many of the reviewers only get an advance copy of the game days before general release and so are under the hammer to get to the end. As games mature and focus on complex themes and stories, reviewers steam roll through a lot of the subtleties and features to get the money in the pocket. I'd like to know just how many times the "critics" actually played through the Beyond Two Souls and could then see that the gamer has far more control over Jody then what they first thought. I'm sharpening an axe for Adam Sesslers back and already took a chunk out of Anthony Carbooni for doing this exact same thing when it came to The Last Of Us.

Another BIG difference here is that as gamers we play games because it's what we like to do with our free time. It's a luxury, hobby and fun. It is a critics job to review, report (not play) it is something that HAS to be done. A job, obligation and time sink. They do not have the freedom we enjoy when it comes to gaming. So they have become less about being our voice and more jaded and cynical. Not to mention there is a long and well doc*mented trail of bribery and embargos that "trust" (something that you put into a complete stranger at your own peril) is only given blindly by the fan boys. Just his week I've heard from 2 members of the industry how attending press events are not fun. Can anyone here honestly say that being on the ground floor of E3, meeting the people who made the games we love, getting behind closed doors to be some of the first to see new games and consoles would not just be a gamers Valhalla. Sounds like a vacation I would happily pay for.
But back to Beyond Two Souls.
Now I know I'm going to sound like a hypocrite here. But Beyond Two Souls is one of those unique "games" so far out in left field so different as to not be a game and yet is kind of. That it is worth trying in the very least.
That is my opinion. From a gamer to a gamer no bias, no bull just for the love of trying and playing something new.
 
 
 
JandTNZ
Posted by JandTNZ
On Sunday 20 Oct 2013 6:29 PM
-
Very sorry about the novel drop. Been thinking about this for a few days.
 
 
 
sick_wierdo
Posted by sick_wierdo
On Sunday 20 Oct 2013 8:27 PM
-
17 October 2013, 08:54 AM Reply to grieving
Your opinion is wrong because you haven't played it.
How does that make my opinion wrong because it's what others have said that have played it, which I clearly stated. Learn to read moron.
 
 
 
Chris Redfield NZGamer.com VIP VIP Gold
Posted by Chris Redfield
On Thursday 24 Oct 2013 5:44 PM
-
9 October 2013, 03:22 PM Reply to Syn-Ryn
Based on Quantic Dreams last two games, my expectations for this are pretty low.

Fahrenheit was just complete sh*t, and is one of the worst games I've ever actually taken the time to finish, just to see how bad it could get.

Heavy Rain was enjoyable the first time I played through it, and was certainly a lot better than Fahrenheit, but the story was a poorly written mess.
I accidentally downthumbed you when it was meant to be an up thumb. So everyone mentally add two to Syns score.
 
 
 
Jakted NZGamer.com VIP VIP
Posted by Jakted
On Monday 3 Mar 2014 2:38 PM
-
i brought this game 2 weeks ago its way better than i thought it would be