GOG.com Retracts Regionalized Pricing Proposal

GOG.com Retracts Regionalized Pricing Proposal

Popular digital game distributor Good Old Games (GOG.com), a site which focuses on older titles but still sells select new games, have retracted a previously-announced policy that would likely have resulted in Kiwi gamers paying more for some titles on the service.

"We wish that we could offer these games at flat prices everywhere in the world," GOG.com stated back in February, "but the decision on pricing is always in our partners' hands, and regional pricing is becoming the standard around the globe. We're doing this because we believe that there's no better way to accomplish our overall goals for DRM-Free gaming and GOG.com."

The feedback since that announcement, however, has forced the company to rethink their strategy, culiminating in the revelation that regional pricing is something they will fight using their own money if they have to.

"We will adamantly continue to fight for games with flat worldwide pricing," a statement from Marcin "iWi" Iwinski & Guillaume "TheFrenchMonk" Rambourg on GOG.com read. "If that fails and we are required to have regional prices, we will make up the difference for you out of our own pockets" (emphasis added.)

"For now it will be with $5.99 and $9.99 game codes. In a couple of months, once we have such functionality implemented, we will give you store credit instead, which then you will be able to use towards any purchase and cover the price of it in full or partially. Effectively gamers from all around the world will be able to benefit from the US prices."

The games affected by the new policy include Age of Wonders 3, Divinity: Original Sin, and The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt.

Additionally, GOG.com reaffirmed their commitment to a DRM-free distribution system. "Abandoning fixed regional pricing means it will probably take longer to get some games," GOG stated, "but you've made it clear that sacrificing fair pricing for more DRM-free games isn't acceptable."



 

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Comments Comments (4)

 
Posted by Goonertron
On Monday 17 Mar 2014 7:06 PM
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Most publishers are based in America anyway, so why not just charge the US price then they don't have to worry about conversion rates because with the NZD so high against the USD it is daylight robbery when they charge you $110 on the NZ Xbox store for Titanfall but if you simply change you region and zipcode to US it's all of the sudden it's $72 dollars. I feel like the only reason we don't get parity with US pricing is because of EB games and their ridiculous pricing like $118 for Titanfall which is $100 USD...
 
 
 
Posted by Nibblo
On Monday 17 Mar 2014 8:38 PM
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17 March 2014, 07:06 PM Reply to Goonertron
Most publishers are based in America anyway, so why not just charge the US price then they don't have to worry about conversion rates because with the NZD so high against the USD it is daylight robbery when they charge you $110 on the NZ Xbox store for Titanfall but if you simply change you region and zipcode to US it's all of the sudden it's $72 dollars. I feel like the only reason we don't get parity with US pricing is because of EB games and their ridiculous pricing like $118 for Titanfall which is $100 USD...
Couldn't agree more. NZ game shops need to lower their prices. I buy most of mine from UK outfits because they are so much cheaper. Warehouse can offer pretty good deals though.

Good on GOG, always used them more than Steam when I buy PC games mainly because I like the older games back catalog they have.
 
 
 
Posted by Bappernz
On Tuesday 18 Mar 2014 12:30 PM
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This is a really great website that just seems to be doing things right
 
 
 
Shoel
Posted by Shoel
On Tuesday 18 Mar 2014 7:10 PM
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Good guy GOG