The Weekend Chat: Game Preservation, and Publishers

 
 

Earlier this week, it was reported that an amateur game preservationist’s project was all but dead, following the loss of hundreds of vintage game cartridges in the mail – adding up to about $10,000 USD. The industrious fan – who is also known in the scene for his multi-console emulator – intended to receive the games from a collector, and dump the original data on a hard drive for posterity.

Preservation of artistic mediums isn’t something new; everything from paintings to movies are often rigorously looked after by organisations and governments, as canvases and film-reels deteriorate over time. While gaming is a relatively new medium, preserving them in their original form is becoming harder to do so, as cartridge batteries fail, and bit-rot sets in.

So, should the onus be on publishers to maintain their games for historical purposes?

Should publishers be more pro-active? If there’s no monetary gain, what incentive do they have to do so? Should they work more closely with these amateur preservationists?

Let us know in the comments below!

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Comments Comments (5)

 
Posted by Bunnny
On Friday 17 Feb 2017 4:38 PM
1
As said. I think we are still in the early stages of this. For anything of value from now on pretty sure there will be a copy somewhere. Legal or not.
 
 
 
Posted by drunk_monk
On Saturday 18 Feb 2017 8:11 AM
1
I think publishers should make and effort but they don't need to. They are in it for the money not the art.

I think the bigger question is what state should be preserved. The version sold on disc that would be the one many played, for better or worse, or the patched to hell versions? Or both?
 
 
 
Posted by Ryzlin
On Saturday 18 Feb 2017 11:06 AM
2
Honestly I think a lot of developers are missing out of a huge market for retro games. I know there are websites that allow you to play pretty every mega drive game, but if Sega made a website that allowed properly optimised for PC versions of old games they could easily charge a small fee to keep up servers and allow everyone to play older games.
 
 
 
Posted by Syn-Ryn
On Saturday 18 Feb 2017 12:38 PM
1
18 February 2017, 11:06 AM Reply to Ryzlin
Honestly I think a lot of developers are missing out of a huge market for retro games. I know there are websites that allow you to play pretty every mega drive game, but if Sega made a website that allowed properly optimised for PC versions of old games they could easily charge a small fee to keep up servers and allow everyone to play older games.
Sega already sell Megadrive games through Steam.
 
 
 
Posted by Ryzlin
On Saturday 18 Feb 2017 3:39 PM
1
18 February 2017, 12:38 PM Reply to Syn-Ryn
Sega already sell Megadrive games through Steam.
But sadly my favourite Mega Drive game is not. I would have brought a whole system if I had found that one game in Japan.