The Weekend Chat: Hurry up and Wait

 
 

Games are about immediacy – you push a button, and something happens. That mentality trickles down to every aspect of how they’re presented and marketed too. “Watch the trailer! Get the latest patch! Pre-order now!”

The last few weeks marked the release of some very high profile games – both of which were delayed significantly; The Last Guardian was first shown in 2009, while Final Fantasy XV was teased a decade ago. While both of these games turned out fine, that isn’t always the case. So this week, we ask you:

Should we even be announcing games before they’re feature complete and nearly done?

Do you like boarding the hype train early, or do you find it exhausting? Is it irresponsible of publishers, or is it best to keep audiences in the know?

Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

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Comments Comments (19)

 
Posted by Bank
On Friday 9 Dec 2016 4:21 PM
4
If I could, I'd honestly always be the hypetrain engineer. Hahah sorry everyone.
Just buy a ticket. You can easily have naps.
 
 
 
Posted by LukeB
On Friday 9 Dec 2016 4:41 PM
5
In my ideal world, I'd have games officially announced no earlier than the E3 during the year prior to the titles release - I not one for boarding a 3+ year hype train.
 
 
 
Posted by Paorio
On Friday 9 Dec 2016 5:16 PM
2
I hop on and off, usually back on right around release
 
 
 
Posted by SpawnSeekSlay
On Friday 9 Dec 2016 6:47 PM
3
Yeah I think any announcement should be done close to release. I like the way Bethesda Softworks do it, Skyrim or Fallouts will release within a month or a few months of announcement.
You see what happens with the likes of No Mans Sky - build a trailer for how you plan it to look and work, then you see what the final game really looks like and what they could do in that timeframe, and it all backfires.
 
 
 
Posted by Haydyn
On Friday 9 Dec 2016 7:24 PM
4
I find anything more than a year and it seems too far away to be interested in, just something to keep in mind. I do love reveals and trailers leading up to a games release from 3 - 4 months out.
 
 
 
Posted by koyukon
On Friday 9 Dec 2016 7:42 PM
2
I don't like waiting more than the current year of announcement. Over it
 
 
 
Posted by ptys
On Friday 9 Dec 2016 9:30 PM
1
I'm all for hype if a developer has proved they can deliver with a solid track record as waiting for a game you know is going to be good is unlike any other medium.
 
 
 
Posted by ChieftaiNZ
On Saturday 10 Dec 2016 7:12 AM
1
Anoouncing a game that far ahead of launch is only going to end badly, as peoples expectatiosn get out of hand. This is why Hl3 will nevever be released, it would ruin Valve.
 
 
 
Posted by Ryzlin
On Saturday 10 Dec 2016 9:20 AM
1
As much as I would love every company to do what Bethesda has been doing, and releasing games within six months of announcement, it's just no feasible. For two reasons. Companies need preorder to gage interest and they need time tfor people to make those preorder. Secondly, has anyje else niticedbthe amount if leaks this year? I was on the hype train for a BioShock remaster a year and a half before it came out because if leaks. Even Bethesda has had them. You can find articles about fallout 4 being based in Boston as far back as 2013ish. Well before announcement.
 
 
 
Posted by ThatUndeadLegacy
On Saturday 10 Dec 2016 9:23 AM
-
Im still Waiting for Bannerlord the hype in the fanbase it fever pitch.
 
 
 
Posted by predatorhunter
On Saturday 10 Dec 2016 11:34 AM
2
Imo game should only be officially announced 6 -8 months before they are released. So they need to be at least 80% finished when they say look here's this.

It seems Playstation has got the biggest gaps between when shown first and released.
 
 
 
Posted by 163Battery
On Saturday 10 Dec 2016 5:29 PM
1
Hard one to pick. A lot of valid points here. On the one hand, companies need to figure out if there is enough interest in a game for them to make it. Imagine sinking a heap of money and man hours into developing something, announcing it shortly before release and finding out that actually, no one wants what you are selling.

On the other hand, releasing amazing trailers and details about a game and then not actually releasing it for years is likely to turn people off. How long can you really stay hyped for something? And releasing awesome trailers and details before you have developed much of the game is asking for trouble. A while back now but they released a bunch of awesome trailers for Halo 2 and then as they got further into development realised that the Xbox wasn't actually capable of doing what the trailer showed. Despite that, the game was still great which was fortunate for the franchise and the console but things don't always work out like that.

I reckon maybe short statements saying something along the lines of we are making this game, general outline and rough idea of release date to keep gamers informed. Then when there is real progress in development, start releasing details and trailers of how the finished product will be. This way, developers know they aren't short changing their customers and gamers can be confident that what they buy is going to be similar to what the advertising/trailers said it would be.

Looking at you, No Man's Sky.
 
 
 
Posted by FreddlePopGameS
On Saturday 10 Dec 2016 5:56 PM
1
I'm not too fussed about teasers of games or announcements and then hearing nothing for years.
Now that I'm older I'm pretty patient when it comes to games..
I kind of feel it's a good thing if an announced game gets pushed back to make it a better product. I know there a certain games that have had that happen and then fail to deliver but certain games like for example The Legend of Zelda, I can wait for as long as it takes knowing the game will deliver and the extra wait was worth it.
 
 
 
Posted by ChieftaiNZ
On Saturday 10 Dec 2016 8:08 PM
-
10 December 2016, 05:56 PM Reply to FreddlePopGameS
I'm not too fussed about teasers of games or announcements and then hearing nothing for years.
Now that I'm older I'm pretty patient when it comes to games..
I kind of feel it's a good thing if an announced game gets pushed back to make it a better product. I know there a certain games that have had that happen and then fail to deliver but certain games like for example The Legend of Zelda, I can wait for as long as it takes knowing the game will deliver and the extra wait was worth it.
No Mans Sky got delayed multiple times. Look how that turned out.
 
 
 
Posted by FreddlePopGameS
On Saturday 10 Dec 2016 10:48 PM
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10 December 2016, 08:08 PM Reply to ChieftaiNZ
No Mans Sky got delayed multiple times. Look how that turned out.
Exactly my point, that on some occasions delays happen and the wait isn't worth it, but I don't think that's to do with the actual game but more so with too much one eyed hope that the game will deliver. This is far too common among console exclusives that get hyped up for a gaming platform and then built up with ridiculous expectation by fanboys of the specific console they support.
Who had ever heard of the developer Hello Games before No Mans Sky was announced and why did people have such big expectations in a developer with no previous games that has demonstrated their talent and track record on delivering a fined tuned gaming experience?
I've always thought the game looked boring, sounded boring and to voice the common opinion of those who have played it, it is boring.
If the game being made was by Bethesda, Rockstar, Nintendo, Square-Enix, Cd Projekt Red and Naughty Dog, then it's safe to say they have delayed it for a reason and again they are developers that have a high level of trust when delivering on their products. The risk in going all fanboy and hyping games from these companies and some others is low risk because we know they have the development talent and they have games in their history that have constantly delivered in the past.
 
 
 
Posted by guido
On Sunday 11 Dec 2016 11:30 AM
2
Totally depends on the game but generally speaking what I think SHOULD happen is... Announce game at E3, deliver game later that same year or early next year at latest with follow ups at TGS, PSX etc. for a shorter but intense hype bullet train rather than the lumbering hype train wrecks we're often getting #trainAnalogies

But because I follow the industry and have an interest in all things game dev related, for games like The Last Guardian, FF XV, Elder Scrolls, Zelda, Cyberpunk 2077 etc I would love to see the whole process from beginning to end laid bare from the very first meeting where nothing more than the tone of the game is discussed right through to the game going gold! But this should not be used as marketing material and should be confined to GDC, Gamasutra etc and kept out of E3 and the like.
 
 
 
Posted by kmarrt
On Sunday 11 Dec 2016 12:37 PM
-
I prefer they sort of kept it to within a year or its intended release date myself. Or somewhere around that like the E3 the year before kind of thing. I like E3 how there are usually quite a few games announced at once. The part I dont like about that is quite often they are announced years in advance and I tend to lose interest if its too far out.

Delays are different. I dont really mind when I have to download a day one patch because my internet isnt too bad and I tend to only play on weekends so I dont have to wait usually. However I think every effort should be made to have a "complete" game on release.
 
 
 
Posted by ironfist92
On Monday 12 Dec 2016 2:11 AM
1
The game should be completely playable when they announce/unveil it. Gain hype for a few months/full year until release, and use that extra time to polish and refine the game and fix bugs.
 
 
 
Posted by NZBuc
On Monday 12 Dec 2016 12:42 PM
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9 December 2016, 04:41 PM Reply to LukeB
In my ideal world, I'd have games officially announced no earlier than the E3 during the year prior to the titles release - I not one for boarding a 3+ year hype train.
I reckon no more than 15 months before release (well scheduled release anyway)